BlackSky is expanding sales and marketing now that it is a publicly-traded company

BlackSky is expanding sales and marketing now that it is a publicly-traded company

On September 13, BlackSky CEO Brian O’Toole rang New York Stock Exchange’s opening bell. A day after completing a merger with the special purpose acquisition company, the satellite imagery and the geospatial data supplier began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. According to O’Toole, the SPAC deal released $283 million in funds, which the business intends to use to hire people, develop and deploy satellites, and create more complex data analytics tools.

He stated that one of his immediate goals is to increase BlackSky’s sales and marketing operations. “We’re seeing a lot of market demands, both from the government and from businesses, so we’re putting together a reseller network as well as sales teams.” BlackSky is going to be under pressure as a public company to demonstrate that it can reach aggressive growth ambitions. According to O’Toole, the company expects to make $40 million in the year and more than quadruple that amount next year.

Government contracts presently account for more than 90% of the company’s revenue, mainly from National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), and Defense Department (DoD). The company intends to secure additional defense and intelligence deals in the coming year, as well as new commercial clients. According to O’Toole, BlackSky has 6 satellites in orbit. Six others are now stationed at Rocket Lab’s launch facility in New Zealand, awaiting launch possibilities once the country’s coronavirus quarantine is lifted later this month.

According to O’Toole, the corporation plans to launch 30 satellites in the long run. Leo Stella, which is 50 percent managed by BlackSky, manufactures the satellites. BlackSky’s service uses data from its satellites as well as data from other sources. Visual vision is combined with data such as radio-frequency mapping, synthetic aperture radar, and Internet of Things feeds.

“We’ll keep expanding those and building analytics around them,” O’Toole added. The data is available as a software-as-a-service that may be accessed via the internet. Users can log in and task a satellite by pointing and clicking. They have 90 minutes to receive data or subscribe to the company’s analytics feeds.

During the COVID-19 epidemic, O’Toole said, the company witnessed an increase in sales as government agencies turned to telework and wanted a platform that analysts could utilize without needing to get into the office. “We’re seeing that pretty much across the board in most of the businesses we’re talking to currently.”

On September 13, BlackSky CEO Brian O’Toole rang New York Stock Exchange’s opening bell. A day after completing a merger with the special purpose acquisition company, the satellite imagery and the geospatial data supplier began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. According to O’Toole, the SPAC deal released $283 million in funds, which the business intends to use to hire people, develop and deploy satellites, and create more complex data analytics tools.

He stated that one of his immediate goals is to increase BlackSky’s sales and marketing operations. “We’re seeing a lot of market demands, both from the government and from businesses, so we’re putting together a reseller network as well as sales teams.” BlackSky is going to be under pressure as a public company to demonstrate that it can reach aggressive growth ambitions. According to O’Toole, the company expects to make $40 million in the year and more than quadruple that amount next year.

Government contracts presently account for more than 90% of the company’s revenue, mainly from National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), and Defense Department (DoD). The company intends to secure additional defense and intelligence deals in the coming year, as well as new commercial clients. According to O’Toole, BlackSky has 6 satellites in orbit. Six others are now stationed at Rocket Lab’s launch facility in New Zealand, awaiting launch possibilities once the country’s coronavirus quarantine is lifted later this month.

According to O’Toole, the corporation plans to launch 30 satellites in the long run. Leo Stella, which is 50 percent managed by BlackSky, manufactures the satellites. BlackSky’s service uses data from its satellites as well as data from other sources. Visual vision is combined with data such as radio-frequency mapping, synthetic aperture radar, and Internet of Things feeds.

“We’ll keep expanding those and building analytics around them,” O’Toole added. The data is available as a software-as-a-service that may be accessed via the internet. Users can log in and task a satellite by pointing and clicking. They have 90 minutes to receive data or subscribe to the company’s analytics feeds.

During the COVID-19 epidemic, O’Toole said, the company witnessed an increase in sales as government agencies turned to telework and wanted a platform that analysts could utilize without needing to get into the office. “We’re seeing that pretty much across the board in most of the businesses we’re talking to currently.”

BlackSky is a major source of geospatial intelligence in real-time. BlackSky uses new sensor networks and its own satellite constellation to monitor activities and facilities all around the world. Every day, BlackSky handles thousands of data elements from its constellation, as well as sensors and data feeds from space, IoT, and terrestrial sources. A site can be imaged many times during the day using BlackSky’s on-demand network of satellites. BlackSky looks for anomalies in pattern-of-life to generate warnings and improve situational awareness.

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